NPSEC News – September 14th, 2018


 

NPSEC News – September 14th, 2018

2018 National Pesticide Applicator Certification & Safety Education Workshop Evaluation

If you attended the workshop, we invite you to complete our workshop survey. You can find the survey by clicking here. Please complete the survey by September 20th, 2018.

PERC offers Web-Based WPS Train the Trainer Course

  • It’s posted here on the PERC website.
  • The cost is $35, which covers the cost of the hosting, course maintenance, and certification management.
  • It will be offered via the NPSEC Store, hosted by eXtension.

This web-based course provides the information required to train those who will train agricultural workers and pesticide handlers under the WPS (CFR 170). It will guide you through the necessary procedures to provide effective training about pesticide safety topics. This course is one way to become qualified to train agricultural workers and pesticide handlers under the WPS.

This is a self-paced eLearning course; you will view eLearning modules, take quizzes, and complete a final exam at your own pace. Once you have successfully completed all the course requirements, passed the final exam with the minimum passing score of 70% and then completed the course evaluation, you will be issued a WPS pesticide safety trainer certification. This course will take you approximately two to three hours to complete.

Completion of this course certifies you as a qualified WPS trainer of agricultural workers and pesticide handlers in the continental U.S, Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. You must check with your state or tribal pesticide regulatory agency for possible additional requirements.

If you have any questions about this message, please direct them to PERC using the contact information below.

Suzanne Forsyth, PERC Director
UC Davis Extension
530-757-8603
email: spforsyth@ucdavis.edu

Kaci Buhl, PERC Deputy Director
Oregon State University
541-737-8330
email: kaci.buhl@oregonstate.edu

NPSEC Video Feature

 

Natalie Hoidal, PSEP Coordinator at the University of Minnesota, shares her experience at the 2018 National Pesticide Applicator Certification and Safety Education Workshop in San Antonio, TX.

Shop the NPSEC Store

New WPS products on the NPSEC Store: WPS videos, Spanish train the Trainer manual, WPS Ag Employers Handbook!!! The NPSEC Store is a good place to find EPA-approved materials with expanded 2015 WPS content. This is where you can order NPSEC, PERC, WPS, and state-specific products. For PERC products, PSEPs get a 5% discount if they purchase the products using the code we mailed you at checkout. We track all PERC sales by state and send 5% of all net sales in a particular state or territory back to the PSEP as a gift.

 

PERC offers Web-Based WPS Train the Trainer Course

This information was originally published by PERC and adapted for use by NPSEC.

Web-Based Training for Trainers of Agricultural Workers and Pesticide Handlers under the National Worker Protection Standard (WPS)

·         It’s posted here on the PERC website.
·         The cost is $35, which covers the cost of the hosting, course maintenance, and certification management.
·         It will be offered via the NPSEC Store, hosted by eXtension.
 
This web-based course provides the information required to train those who will train agricultural workers and pesticide handlers under the WPS (CFR 170). It will guide you through the necessary procedures to provide effective training about pesticide safety topics. This course is one way to become qualified to train agricultural workers and pesticide handlers under the WPS.
 
This is a self-paced eLearning course; you will view eLearning modules, take quizzes, and complete a final exam at your own pace. Once you have successfully completed all the course requirements, passed the final exam with the minimum passing score of 70% and then completed the course evaluation, you will be issued a WPS pesticide safety trainer certification. This course will take you approximately two to three hours to complete.
 
Completion of this course certifies you as a qualified WPS trainer of agricultural workers and pesticide handlers in the continental U.S, Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. You must check with your state or tribal pesticide regulatory agency for possible additional requirements.
 
If you have any questions about this message, please direct them to PERC using the contact information below.
Suzanne Forsyth, PERC Director
UC Davis Extension
530-757-8603
email: 
spforsyth@ucdavis.edu
Kaci Buhl, PERC Deputy Director 
Oregon State University
541-737-8330
email: 
kaci.buhl@oregonstate.edu
 
About PERC: PERC is led by University of California of Davis Extension and Oregon State University, and is funded by a 5-year cooperative agreement (#X8-83616301) from the U.S. EPA. PERC aims to support the development of resources/materials about the safe use of pesticides by applicators and handlers in agricultural, commercial, and residential settings. Materials could include brochures, factsheets, posters, videos, manuals, and mobile tools, while addressing the needs of low-literacy and multilingual audiences. These materials will help prevent pesticide exposure incidents for pesticide applicators, handlers, workers, and their families. The PERC supports the U.S. EPA’s Strategic Goal 1, Objective 1.4 – Ensure Safety of Chemicals in the Marketplace.

NPSEC News – September 6th, 2018


 

NPSEC News – September 6th, 2018

2018 National Pesticide Applicator Certification & Safety Education Workshop 

We had a wonderful few days in San Antonio at the 2018 NPACSE Workshop. There were 141 total attendees representing 45 states and 3 territories. If you were unable to attend the workshop, please feel free to visit us online to view the various presentations.

If you attended the workshop, we invite you to complete our workshop survey. You can find the survey by clicking here

eXtension Foundation and NPSEC Pesticide Safety Education Funds Management Program (PSEFMP) Funding Opportunity

The eXtension Foundation (EF) has announced a funding opportunity for Land Grant University Pesticide Safety Education Programs (PSEP) for 2019. This opportunity is made available through a cooperative agreement (#X8-83698001) with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to establish and administer a national sub-award program in support of pesticide applicator education, and training for certified applicators of restricted used pesticides. The National Pesticide Safety Education Center (NPSEC) will continue to collaborate with EF to lead the professional development part of the project and to assist PSEPs in enhancing some of the educational products they develop as part of the expectations attached to the funding. Read the full story here.

Pesticide Safety Education Funds Management Program (PSEFMP) Success Story

eXtension received this grant from the EPA to establish and administer a national sub-award program in support of pesticide applicator education and training for certified applicators of restricted use pesticides. eXtension was invited in early 2017 to apply for this grant by pesticide safety education coordinators and the National Pesticide Safety Education Center (NPSEC). The goal of NPSEC is to support Extension Pesticide Safety Education Programs (PSEP) across the nation. Forty-six PSEPs are benefitting from this grant with projects aimed at improving the quality of pesticide applicator training.

Katie Moore, an Extension Associate for Pesticide Safety Education saw a need to improve the quality of pesticide applicator training material and classes. Prior to her project, pesticide applicators in South Carolina were required to complete a 7-hour video-based course for training. Through the Pesticide Safety Education Funds Management Program (PSEFMP) grant, Katie created a new training program that would be delivered by Extension educators to improve the overall educational quality, and reduced the training time to 3-hours, saving thousands of man-hours for applicators in South Carolina, and increasing overall compliance. The current passing rate for this training is 85%.

 

Katie Moore, PSEP Coordinator from Clemson University, shares how her program has benefitted from the PSEFMP grant.

From our News & Events Page

Shop the NPSEC Store

The NPSEC Store is a good place to find EPA-approved materials with expanded 2015 WPS content. This is where you can order NPSEC, PERC, WPS, and state-specific products. For PERC products, PSEPs get a 5% discount if they purchase the products using the code we mailed you at checkout. We track all PERC sales by state and send 5% of all net sales in a particular state or territory back to the PSEP as a gift.

 

eXtension Foundation and National Pesticide Safety Education Center (NPSEC) Pesticide Safety Education Funds Management Program (PSEFMP) Funding Opportunity

The eXtension Foundation (EF) is pleased to announce a funding opportunity for Land Grant University Pesticide Safety Education Programs (PSEP) for 2019. This opportunity is made available through a cooperative agreement (#X8-83698001) with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to establish and administer a national sub-award program in support of pesticide applicator education, and training for certified applicators of restricted used pesticides. The National Pesticide Safety Education Center (NPSEC) will continue to collaborate with EF to lead the professional development part of the project and to assist PSEPs in enhancing some of the educational products they develop as part of the expectations attached to the funding.

Requirements of sub-awardees for this program to receive funding are as follows:

    • Agree to share one educational material or product for the purposes of enhancing PSEP programs both regionally and nationally.

    • Submit progress reports every six (6) months using a standard online template.

    • Attend a minimum of one of the following 1-hour training webinars as part of this program for reporting system training and professional development. Anticipated dates are: January 31, 2019 at 3 pm EST; May 6, 2019 at 1 pm EST; September 30, 2019 at 3 pm EST and December 2, 2019 at 3:00 pm EST.

Eligibility

In order to be eligible for this funding opportunity applicants must be affiliated with a U.S. Land Grant University. Only one application per state will be eligible for funding and preference will go to 1862 Land Grant Universities. Please contact psefmp-helpdesk@extension.org if you have any questions regarding eligibility.

Funding Period

The funding period for this subaward will be Jan. 1, 2019 – December 31, 2019.

Funding Available

Each PSEP will be eligible to apply for a base amount of $18,750.00 USD plus 5% of the funds divided proportionally based on the percentage of the number of certified applicators in each state or territory. The number of certified applicators in a state or territory will be based on the most recent figures of certified applicators as supplied by the EPA. Additional amounts available to the state or territory will be listed in the budget section. Payments to successful sub-awardees will be made January 3 – 15, 2019.

Key Dates

Application System Opens: Monday, October 1, 2018 at 8 am EST

First round of reviews: October 22, 2018

Second round of reviews: November 19, 2018

Application Deadline: Saturday, December 1, 2018 at 8 pm EST

Final round of reviews: December 10, 2018

Sub-award Notification Announcement: December 21, 2018

Funds distributed by: January 15, 2019

Application Review Process:

EF will use a multi-step approach in the receiving and review of applications for this program. Each application will be reviewed by EF and an advisory panel including representatives from NPSEC, APPCO, AAPSE, PERC and the PSEP community for eligibility, compliance, completeness and potential collaboration. Additionally, through this process, applicants will have the opportunity to be involved in a NPSEC subject group to create educational materials.

Application Submission

In an effort to make the application process as streamlined and user friendly as possible, applicants will be able to download, sign, scan, and upload the sub-award agreement from the application site. Applications that have not been signed will not be considered for funding. The average time for completion of an application is 56 minutes.

Applications for this funding opportunity can be accessed at the following link on October 1, 2018 at 8:00 am EST: https://applyextension.smapply.io (Note: Link will not be active until October 1, 2018 at 8:00 am EST).

Online Application System Training:

PSEPs will receive an invitation for optional training via Zoom for October 1, 2018 at 11 am EST for the online application system. During training, EF will provide a step by step walk through of the application site, application and submission. For those who are unable to attend the training, it will be recorded and sent via email to view at your convenience. Additional trainings will also be held the same week.

Applicants with any questions please send an email to psefmp-helpdesk@extension.org.

About eXtension Foundation

The United States Cooperative Extension System, with funding from Cooperative Extension directors and administrators, and USDA-NIFA, shares resources and tools through eXtension that enables the Extension workforce to scale up its local and national impact. eXtension is an integral part of the national Extension Committee on Organization and Policy (ECOP) and is organized as a 501(c)3 non-profit membership organization. Its Board of Directors represents the five regions of Cooperative Extension, ECOP, and USDA-NIFA.

About National Pesticide Safety Education Center

The NPSEC seeks to strengthen the national system of university extension Pesticide Safety Education Programs by improving the quality, consistency, and accessibility of educational offerings, promoting collaboration and leveraging of educational resources and learning assessment tools, and increasing revenue generation. The Center, originally incubated by eXtension Foundation received start-up funding from CropLife Foundation and crop protection companies BASF, Bayer, Dow AgroSciences, DuPont, and Syngenta. NPSEC does not receive any EPA funding under the EPA-eXtension Foundation cooperative agreement.

Attachments

2019 PSEFMP Application Instructions
2019 PSEFMP FAQs

Building IPM Capacity in Missouri Through Train-the-Trainer Workshops and Effective Partnerships

This article was originally published by the Journal of Integrated Pest Management. Below is just an abstract. The full article link is available below the abstract. 

At times when the Cooperative Extension System (CES) continues to receive decreased funding to accomplish its core mission, a useful strategy to mitigate such effects is train-the-trainer workshops conducted through partnerships. Here, we describe steps taken to conduct, over a 5-yr period, six train-the-trainer workshops coordinated by the Lincoln University (LU) IPM program in cooperation with the Missouri Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) program, the University of Missouri (MU) Extension, and the Missouri Department of Agriculture (MDA). Subject matter experts from 10 U.S. states provided training to 228 educators from MU Extension, LU Cooperative Extension, USDA Natural Resources and Conservation Service (NRCS), MDA, Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC), University of Illinois Extension, and University of Nebraska Extension as well as vocational educators and growers representing early IPM adopters. At the end of each 2-day workshop, trainees indicated that they significantly increased their IPM knowledge base (a short-term outcome) leading to improved abilities to assist farmers. Important mid-term outcomes were documented. For example, combined results from 9-mo post-workshop surveys indicated that: 1) 3,554 farmers were assisted by 127 trainees (survey responders) using IPM information received at the workshops, 2) 29.7% of the respondents wrote articles for newsletters and/or newspaper columns (179 total outputs), and 3) 87.8% provided one-on-one assistance to clients. Overall, the implementation of the workshops described here was successful, and the outcomes highlight the efforts that the CES in Missouri is taking to train Extension educators and agriculture (Ag) professionals in necessary IPM skills for the benefit of farmers.

Read the full version by clicking here

Insect threats to food security

This article was originally published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Below is only a summary. You can find the link to view the full article on their website below. 

Globally, one out of nine people suffers from chronic hunger, and undernourishment is growing (1). Global average surface temperatures are also rising and are projected to increase by 2° to 5°C this century, with negative impacts on agricultural production. Even today, despite substantial plant protection efforts, about one-third of crops are lost to insect pests, pathogens, and weeds. How will climate warming affect these crop losses on a global scale? On page 916 of this issue, Deutsch et al. (2) evaluate the impact of rising average surface temperatures on yield losses due to insects in wheat, maize, and rice, which are staple foods for billions of people. The results show that insects will cause significantly increased grain loss across many regions of a warmer world.

To read more and be redirected to the original source, click here.

Increase in crop losses to insect pests in a warming climate

This article was originally published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Below is an abstract for the article and a full link is provided below.

Insect pests substantially reduce yields of three staple grains—rice, maize, and wheat—but models assessing the agricultural impacts of global warming rarely consider crop losses to insects. We use established relationships between temperature and the population growth and metabolic rates of insects to estimate how and where climate warming will augment losses of rice, maize, and wheat to insects. Global yield losses of these grains are projected to increase by 10 to 25% per degree of global mean surface warming. Crop losses will be most acute in areas where warming increases both population growth and metabolic rates of insects. These conditions are centered primarily in temperate regions, where most grain is produced.

Read more by clicking here

 

WSSA Advocates for Weed Controls That Protect Soybean Export Value

This Press Release was originally posted by the Weed Science Society of America. The original post can be found on their website here

For Immediate Release WSSA Advocates for Weed Controls That Protect Soybean Export Value WESTMINSTER, Colorado – August 27, 2018 – Experts from the Weed Science Society of America (WSSA) will attend the 2018 Farm Progress show in Boone, Iowa, this week to highlight system-wide strategies for protecting soybean export values by reducing weed seeds in harvested soybean crops.

The U.S. is a major exporter of soybean, which represents more than half of the nation’s $39 billion in annual grain exports. When weed seeds are detected in exported crops, the importing country may impose additional inspections or treatments, or may reject or destroy the shipment. Recurring violations can lead authorities to suspend exports from a given region or to close their import markets entirely.

“Herbicide-resistant weeds have led to a rise in the number of weed seeds finding their way into harvested crops,” says Lee Van Wychen, Ph.D., executive director of science policy for WSSA. “We need a proactive, system-wide strategy to reverse this trend and protect economically important foreign markets.”

WSSA representatives attending the Farm Progress show will promote a system-wide approach developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) to reduce weed seeds in harvested soybean crops. WSSA is among nearly two dozen public agencies, scientific societies, industry organizations, grower groups and trade associations to endorse APHIS’ recommendations, which span weed control during planting, harvesting, storage, handling and transport.

Examples include:

 Regularly vary management practices to eliminate weeds, avoid development of resistant weeds and discourage the buildup of any one weed type.

 Use herbicide mixtures with multiple sites of action, including a combination of pre- and post-emergence herbicides with residual control.

 Rotate crops to lower weed densities, increase crop yields and improve soil quality.  Plant with narrow spacing between rows to allow plants to form a closed canopy and out-compete weeds for sun and water.

 Remove late-season weeds that have escaped.

 Adjust combine settings to remove weed seeds.

 Regularly clean storage bins, augers and legs, transport vehicles and farm equipment to prevent weed spread and cross-crop contamination.

The full list of recommended best practices is available for download at the USDA APHIS website.

During the Farm Progress event, WSSA experts will be available at the USDA Farm Service Agency booth (#817, Northeast Exhibit Field) to address grower questions and concerns about on-farm weed management practices.

About the Weed Science Society of America

The Weed Science Society of America, a nonprofit scientific society, was founded in 1956 to encourage and promote the development of knowledge concerning weeds and their impact on the environment. The Society promotes research, education and extension outreach activities related to weeds, provides science-based information to the public and policy makers, fosters awareness of weeds and their impact on managed and natural ecosystems, and promotes cooperation among weed science organizations across the nation and around the world. For more information, visit www.wssa.net.

Press Contact:

Lee Van Wychen
Executive Director of Science Policy, National & Regional Weed Science Societies
Lee.VanWychen@wssa.net
202-746-4686

Discovery of nitrogen fixation in corn announced

This article was originally published by Eric Hamilton of Michigan Farm News. The following is an excerpt from the article. A full link is provided at the bottom. 

A discovery 10 years ago that seemed too good to be true required eight years of public-private collaboration of researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, the University of California, Davis, and Mars Inc., before they were confident to publicly share their findings.

The news could eventually be a game-changer for corn-producers worldwide, with reduced production costs while also addressing environmental challenges. Researchers say further research is required to determine if the trait can be bred into commercial cultivars of corn, the world’s most productive cereal crop.

Read the full article here

BASF closes its acquisition of vegetable seeds business from Bayer

This article was originally posted by BASF. A link to the full article is below.

On Aug. 16, BASF closed the acquisition of Bayer’s global vegetable seeds business, mainly operating under the brand Nunhems®.

The transaction adds a well-recognized brand with a very successful business track record to BASF’s portfolio.

The acquired vegetable seeds business comprises 24 crops and about 2,600 varieties. It also includes well-established, strong R&D and breeding systems with more than 100 unique breeding programs in more than 15 crops.

Click here to read the full article