Lorsban should be available for 2019 use, MSU finds

The original article comes from Vegetable Growers News. The original link can be found here

Chlorpyrifos – sold under the trade name Lorsban – should be legal to use in fruits and vegetables for 2019. This insecticide is the main or only option for controlling key pests in crops including apples, asparagus, cabbage, cherries, transplanted onions, peaches, radishes, rutabagas, and turnips. Growers have expressed concern given a recent ruling by the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals that, if it stands, will require the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to begin a Federal Insecticide Fungicide Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) process to revoke all label uses of this product.

In our recent communications with colleagues at the United States Department of Agriculture(USDA) and Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD), we learned that chlorpyrifos will remain available to use until legal proceedings are finished. This is expected to take time, especially since the EPA has asked for a rehearing of the case before all judges of the 9th Circuit Court.

Dave Epstein of USDA noted, “The 9th Circuit Court has not yet responded, and has given no indication when it will. I see no scenario where Lorsban will not be available for use in 2019, as any cancellation would have to undergo a FIFRA review, and that takes time.”

A contact at MDARD also noted that “even if the 9th Circuit decides not to rehear the case, it’s anticipated that the (Trump) administration will file an appeal with the Supreme Court. I don’t anticipate that this issue will be settled for some time and even if it is, I believe there will be a phase-out process rather than an [immediate] ban.”

It is, of course, impossible to predict exactly what will happen, but the best indications are that chlorpyrifos purchased this winter and spring will be available to use for 2019. We encourage you to keep updated at EPA’s chlorpyrifos website.

– Benjamin WerlingDavid Jones and Zsofia Szendrei, Michigan State University Extension

Great Lakes EXPO will include free medical evaluation service for using respirators

This article is by Ben Phillips and Craig Anderson, Michigan State University. 

The Worker Protection Standard (WPS) is a regulation designed to protect farm workers from dangerous exposure to pesticides. A recent update in 2015 has aligned the WPS with most of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) provisions for using respirators. The revised WPS includes specific requirements for the use of respirators when using pesticide products under the Agricultural Use Requirements that requires the use of a respirator. This revision requires all those who mix, load and apply pesticides (including self-employed pesticide handlers) to have a medical evaluation, and annual fit-tests for each type of respirator required by the pesticide product label and annual training regarding the proper use of each respirator to be used by the handler. The medical evaluation must occur before the employee is fit tested or required to use the respirator in the workplace.

When using a pesticide for uses other than those covered in the Agricultural Use Requirements section of the label, the worker exposure is subject to the requirements of the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard, and either MIOSHA Part 700 or Part 451, including the need for respiratory protection. The Safety Data Sheet for a pesticide would indicate if you need a respirator for non-agricultural uses.

At this years’ Great Lakes Fruit, Vegetable, Farm Market and Greenhouse Growers EXPO, in Grand Rapids, MI, MSU Extension has invited the Great Lakes Bay Health Centers to perform these medical evaluations for growers and their employees who may need to use respirators, free of charge. In addition, Tom Smith, of the National Pesticide Safety and Education Center will be sharing space with the medical team to offer growers all of the resources they need to comply with the revised Worker Protection Standard. Respirator fit-testing will not be provided on site.

The EPA-approved medical evaluation forms are questionnaires that employees must fill out for a physician or other licensed health care professional (PLHCP) to review. The forms are available in English and Spanish. Forms will be provided on-site at EXPO, or can be downloaded and printed from the links above and brought to the EXPO. There will be two licensed health care professionals and two assistants on site to review the forms and provide medical clearances.

How employers must handle the forms. What do they need from you?

Sections 1 and 2 of Part A of the form are required by the law, and must be completed in private by the employee during normal working hours or at a time and place that is convenient for them. While the regulation does not require all of the following information, the employer must complete the following information for the health care provider:

  • The type and weight of respirator that the employee will use.
  • How long and how frequently the employee will use the respirator.*
  • How much physical work the employee will do while using the respirator.*
  • Other PPE the employee will use.*
  • The temperature and humidity extremes of the working environment.*

*Not required, but the questions can be found in Part B, Section 2 of the medical form.

The health care provider may determine that additional questions about the respirator activities is necessary and/or a physical examination. These could include the questions in Part B, Section 1, a pulmonary function test (PFT), or electrocardiogram (ECG). However, the health providers at the Great Lakes EXPO will not be able to perform these tests on site. The most that may happen at EXPO is listening to lungs with a stethoscope and some discussion about the evaluation answers in Part A Sections 1 and 2. Employees may be recommended to seek physical examinations elsewhere.

How health care providers must handle the forms. What do you need from them?

The health care provider will give the employer and the employee a written medical determination (medical release) of the medical evaluation results. An employee cannot use a respirator until this written medical determination is received allowing such use. The determination will include the following information:

  • Whether the employee is medically able to use a respirator.
  • Any restrictions on the employee’s use of the respirator.
  • The need for follow-up medical evaluations.
  • Verification that the health care provider has given the employee a copy of the written medical determination.

Once complete, employers must keep records of the medical determination listed above. It should not include any completed medical questionnaires or detailed notes from any additional medical examinations. That information is confidential and should not be in the possession of the employer.

For more information see:

FAQ regarding the New Worker Protection Standard – Part 1

FAQ regarding the New Worker Protection Standard – Part 2

Worker Protection Standard training requirements for growers

Vegetable pesticide series: Does it require a respirator?

 

 

 

 

PERC Products through the NPSEC Store Benefit Pesticide Safety Education Programs

From Mike Wierda, PSEP Director at Utah State University and NPSEC Treasurer.

This is a reminder of how PERC product sales through the NPSEC Store can benefit your PSEP

  1. PSEP Discount: receive a 5% discount on any PERC products you purchase!
    1. Contact NPSEC to receive the discount code to use at checkout.
    2. Contact NPSEC for a greater discount on bulk orders
  2. Revenue Sharing: 5% of PERC products sold via the NPSEC Store in your state is returned to your PSEP via Revenue Sharing Checks!

Note: These discounts are not mutually exclusive!
Thus, you can purchase PERC supplies at 5% off for your program(s) and then receive 5% of your total purchase back in your Revenue Sharing Check!

NPSEC tracks sales state by state and sends out Revenue Sharing Checks quarterly to PSEPs whose 5% revenue sharing total is ³ $100. Revenue Sharing Checks are sent as gifts! You don’t have to do anything to receive this money.

If you would like to help promote these products to encourage purchases in your state, you can add information and links to your sites or social media accounts. Below are a couple examples from Colorado PSEP:

· Example 1 · Example 2

The NPSEC Store includes descriptions of all products. Feel free to use this wording on your own pages if you wish. The current PERC products available are:

  • WPS Train-the-Trainer Manual (English & Spanish)
  • WPS How to Comply Manual
  • WPS Posters (English, Spanish, & Karen)
  • WPS Videos (English & Spanish)
  • WPS Employer Handbook
  • WPS Train-the-Trainer Online Course
  • Respirator Guide
  • Seed Treatment Manual

Feel free to contact NPSEC with any questions or concerns! Email: tomsmith@npsec.us
Phone: 517.202.3019

Cheers,

Michael R Wierda

Utah PSEP / NPSEC Treasurer

EPA Announces Changes to Dicamba Registration

The original press release came from the EPA and can be found here. The following is copied over from that original press release date 10/31/2018.

EPA Announces Changes To Dicamba Registration

10/31/2018

Contact Information: 

EPA Press Office (press@epa.gov )

WASHINGTON – Today, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that it is extending the registration of dicamba for two years for “over-the-top” use (application to growing plants) to control weeds in fields for cotton and soybean plants genetically engineered to resist dicamba. This action was informed by input from and extensive collaboration between EPA, state regulators, farmers, academic researchers, pesticide manufacturers, and other stakeholders.

“EPA understands that dicamba is a valuable pest control tool for America’s farmers,” said EPA Acting Administrator Andrew Wheeler. “By extending the registration for another two years with important new label updates that place additional restrictions on the product, we are providing certainty to all stakeholders for the upcoming growing season.”

The following label changes were made to ensure that these products can continue to be used effectively while addressing potential concerns to surrounding crops and plants:

Dicamba registration decisions for 2019-2020 growing season

  • Two-year registration (until December 20, 2020)
  • Only certified applicators may apply dicamba over the top (those working under the supervision of a certified applicator may no longer make applications)
  • Prohibit over-the-top application of dicamba on soybeans 45 days after planting and cotton 60 days after planting
  • For cotton, limit the number of over-the-top applications from 4 to 2 (soybeans remain at 2 OTT applications)
  • Applications will be allowed only from 1 hour after sunrise to 2 hours before sunset
  • In counties where endangered species may exist, the downwind buffer will remain at 110 feet and there will be a new 57-foot buffer around the other sides of the field (the 110-foot downwind buffer applies to all applications, not just in counties where endangered species may exist)
  • Clarify training period for 2019 and beyond, ensuring consistency across all three products
  • Enhanced tank clean out instructions for the entire system
  • Enhanced label to improve applicator awareness on the impact of low pH’s on the potential volatility of dicamba
  • Label clean up and consistency to improve compliance and enforceability

The registration for all dicamba products will automatically expire on December 20, 2020, unless EPA further extends it.

EPA has reviewed substantial amounts of new information and concluded that the continued registration of these dicamba products meets FIFRA’s registration standards. The Agency has also determined that extending these registrations with the new safety measures will not affect endangered species.

Learn more: https://www.epa.gov/ingredients-used-pesticide-products/registration-dicamba-use-genetically-engineered-crops

NPSEC News – October 26th, 2018


 

NPSEC News – October 26th, 2018

Communication Tools for PSEPS

Earlier this week, PSEP Coordinators were provided with two tools for communication between PSEP programs only. If you are a PSEP coordinator and you did not receive this information, please contact Aaron Weibe at aaronweibe@npsec.us 

We recognize that every PSEP Program is unique. If you are PSEP Coordinator and you would like to have other Extension Pesticide Safety Education professionals within your organization that you feel would benefit from being included in these tools, please let us know. 

NPSEC Takes Home Most Fundable Project Award at eXtension’s Impact Collaborative Summit

Indianapolis, IN. A NPSEC team comprised of staff and PSEP coordinators that are members of the Respirator Collaboration Team participated in eXtension’s Impact Collaborative Summit in Indianapolis from October 16th – 18th. The purpose of the Summit was for institutional and national Extension teams to bring projects and programs from various topic areas to find new and innovative ways to move their projects and programs forward with the help of the Impact Collaborative Innovation process, Key Informants, and partner/supporting organizations. 32 teams representing 40 institutions attended. 

Working from where they left off at the 2018 National Pesticide Applicator Certification and Safety Education Workshop in San Antonio this past August, the NPSEC Team focused on finding innovative ways to get Collaboration Teams off the ground. The three-day event culminated in a PitchFest, where the team presented their project idea to eXtension and Cooperative Extension leaders, along with external partner and supporting organizations.

As a result of the PitchFest, the NPSEC team won an award in the Most Fundable Project or Program category that has earned the team recognition and a strategic partnership with the eXtension Partner Development Team. The goal is to raise $20,000 for each of NPSEC’s five identified collaboration teams.  

The NPSEC team was comprised of the following individuals:

Candace Bartholomew, University of Connecticut
Mike Wierda, Utah State University
Kerry Richards, University of Delaware
Courtney Weatherbee, Michigan State University
Dean Herzfeld, University of Minnesota
Wayne Buhler, North Carolina State University

News Release on updated USDA IPM Roadmap to guide adoption of IPM

The original press release comes from the USDA. You can find a copy of that full release and contact information here

Key Section from Page 3 of Attachment:

IPM FOCUS AREAS

A primary goal of the National IPM Road Map is to increase adoption and efficiency of effective, economical and safe pest management practices through information exchange and coordination among federal and non-federal researchers, educators, technology innovators and IPM practitioners, including pesticide applicators and other service providers. Pesticide safety education that teaches pesticide applicators sound safety and stewardship practices in the safe and efficacious use of pesticides is an important component of IPM programming across focus areas…

A copy of the release is also available on the NPSEC site here.

NEW NPSEC STORE PRODUCTS!

The NPSEC Store is a good place to find EPA-approved materials with expanded 2015 WPS content. This is where you can order NPSEC, PERC, WPS, and state-specific products. For PERC products, PSEPs get a 5% discount if they purchase the products using the code we mailed you at checkout. We track all PERC sales by state and send 5% of all net sales in a particular state or territory back to the PSEP as a gift. 

Shop the NPSEC Store

PERC PRODUCTS

National Worker Protection Standard: A Manual for Trainers

Available in English and Spanish!

These EPA-approved manuals (English: EPA 730-B-16-001; Spanish: EPA 730-K-17-001)) begin with an introduction to pesticides and pesticide safety, including the federal pesticide regulations. They discusses each of the specific points that must be included in WPS training sessions and contains valuable information to help trainers prepare for and conduct pesticide safety training.

Purchase Here

How to Comply With the 2015 Revised Worker Protection Standard for Agricultural Pesticides

This EPA-approved manual will help users of agricultural pesticides comply with the requirements of the 2015 revised federal Worker Protection Standard. You should read this manual if you employ agricultural  workers or handlers, are involved in the production of agricultural plants as an owner/manager of an agricultural establishment or a commercial (for-hire) pesticide handling establishment, or work as a crop advisor.

Purchase Here

WPS Respiratory Protection Guide: Requirements for Employers of Pesticide Handlers

Under the Worker Protection Standard (WPS) as revised in 2015, there are new requirements for pesticide handlers when pesticide labels require the use of a respirator. This 45-page guide includes step-by-step fit-testing procedures, respirator selection guidance, medical evaluation options, and some frequently asked questions. 

Purchase Here

WPS Posters

Updated WPS Poster(s) for “Central Posting” areas and certain decontamination sites
This poster(s) complies with the requirements in the Worker Protection Standard (WPS) for agricultural pesticides.

Posters come in Large (22×34.5in) and Small (11×17) with a English/Spanish front, and the option of English or Spanish back. All Posters have a gloss laminate finish for durability.

Purchase Here

WPS Training Videos

These WPS training videos for agricultural workers and pesticide handlers apply to many sectors because they include footage and examples from orchards, forestry, nurseries, greenhouses, vineyards, and row crops.

Available in English and Spanish!

Purchase Here

WPS Standard Handbook for Agricultural Employers

Can be purchased individually or in bundles of 2 and 10!

This handbook is formatted as a small booklet, half the size of a sheet of paper. We hope you’ll find it as useful as a handout when training and/or inspecting agricultural work under the WPS.

Purchase Here 

Web-Based Training for Trainers of Agricultural Workers and Pesticide Handlers

Online training course!

This web-based course is EPA-approved, including 12 self-paced learning modules. The course provides the required information for trainers who will perform annual training for agricultural workers and pesticide handlers under the U.S. EPA Worker Protection Standard (WPS). It will guide you through the necessary procedures to provide effective training about pesticide safety topics.

Purchase Here

 

News Release on updated USDA IPM Roadmap to guide adoption of IPM

The original press release comes from the USDA. You can find a copy of that full release and contact information here

Key Section from Page 3 of Attachment:

IPM FOCUS AREAS

A primary goal of the National IPM Road Map is to increase adoption and efficiency of effective, economical and safe pest management practices through information exchange and coordination among federal and non-federal researchers, educators, technology innovators and IPM practitioners, including pesticide applicators and other service providers. Pesticide safety education that teaches pesticide applicators sound safety and stewardship practices in the safe and efficacious use of pesticides is an important component of IPM programming across focus areas.

Production Agriculture

The priority in this focus area is the development and delivery of diverse and effective pest management strategies and technologies that fortify our nation’s food security and are economical to deploy, while also protecting public health, agricultural workers and the environment.

IPM experts, educators, practitioners and stakeholders expect pest management innovations will continue to evolve for food, fiber and ornamental crop production systems that improve their efficiency and effectiveness. IPM practices that prevent, avoid or mitigate pest damage have reduced negative impacts of agricultural production and associated environments by minimizing impairments to wildlife, water, air quality and other natural resources. Fruits, vegetables and other specialty crops make up a major portion of the human diet and require high labor input for production. Agricultural IPM programs help maintain high-quality agricultural food and fiber products, and coupled with pesticide safety and stewardship practices, help protect agricultural workers, consumers and the environment by keeping pesticide exposures within acceptable safety standards. Agricultural IPM programs also extend to and consider pest management in areas beyond production field borders, to places that can harbor or serve as a source of agricultural pests such as adjacent roadsides, rights-ofway, ditches, irrigation canals, storage and processing areas, compost and mulch piles and gravel pits.

Natural Resources

Our nation’s forests, parks, wildlife refuges, military landscapes and other natural areas, as well as our public land and water resources, are under constant pressure from endemic pests and aggressive invasive species. Invasive pests diminish habitat quality by out-competing native species for resources, reducing biological diversity, richness and abundance; impairing grazing lands for livestock and foraging habitats for wildlife; and degrading or impairing many other uses of public lands, waters and natural areas. Americans value, and spend large amounts of time, in natural and recreational environments like lakes, streams, parks and other open spaces. Protecting the ecosystem functions, aesthetic standards and values of natural resources and recreational environments is as important as protecting public health and safety. IPM practices help minimize the adverse environmental effects of pest species on our natural areas. As we move into the future, commonly used and accepted metrics are needed to quantify the impact of IPM programs and practices in these environments.

Residential, Structural and Public Areas

For the general public, the greatest exposure to pests and control tactics occurs where people live, work, learn and recreate. IPM programs for schools and public buildings are excellent examples of successful education and implementation programs designed for institutional facilities. Priorities in this area include enhanced collaboration and coordination to expand these programs to other public institutions and infrastructure. Residential and commercial environments require different tools and educational materials than schools, and multifamily public housing structures present particular challenges, including addressing pest issues for people who are unable or unauthorized to manage pests themselves. Expanding IPM programs in these areas would reduce human health risks posed by pests and mitigate the adverse environmental effects of potentially harmful pest management practices. Preventing and controlling bed bug and cockroach infestations in multifamily and public housing and other built environments is a high priority.

Original Release

WASHINGTON, October 24, 2018 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced today the first update since 2013 of the National Road Map for Integrated Pest Management (IPM).

The update culminates a yearlong review by the Federal Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Coordinating Committee (FIPMCC), a joint effort that is coordinated by the Office of Pest Management Policy in the Office of USDA’s Chief Economist with representatives of all federal agencies with responsibilities in IPM research, implementation, or education programs. These agencies include Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Department of the Interior (DOI), and Department of Defense (DoD).

Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is a science-based, sustainable decision-making process that uses information on pest biology, environmental data, and technology to manage pest damage in a way that minimizes both economic costs and risks to people, property, and the environment.

The National Road Map for Integrated Pest Management (IPM), first introduced in 2004, is periodically updated to reflect the evolving science, practice, and nature of IPM. The Road Map provides guidance to the IPM community on the adoption of effective, economical, and safe IPM practices, and on the development of new practices where needed. The guidance defines, prioritizes, and articulates pest management challenges across many landscapes, including: agriculture, forests, parks, wildlife refuges, military bases, as well as in residential, and public areas, such as public housing and schools. The Road Map also helps to identify priorities for IPM research, technology, education and implementation through information exchange and coordination among federal and non-federal researchers, educators, technology innovators, and IPM practitioners.

About OCE Office of Pest Management Policy

The USDA’s Office of Pest Management Policy (OPMP) is responsible for the development and coordination of Department policy on pest management and pesticides. It coordinates activities and services of the Department, including research, extension, and education activities, coordinates interagency activities, and consults with agricultural producers that may be affected by USDA-related pest management or pesticide-related activities or actions. OPMP also works with EPA on pesticide and water pollution issues and represents USDA at national and international scientific and policy conferences.

NPSEC News – October 4th, 2018


 

NPSEC News – October 4th, 2018

PSEFMP Funding Application is Live!

The Pesticide Safety Education Funds Management Program (PSEFMP) application for 2019 funding went live on Monday, October 1, 2018.

Applications can be accessed through: https://applyextension.smapply.io/

Key Dates to remember:

  • Application system opens: Monday, October 1, 2018 at 8 am EST
  • First round of reviews: October 22, 2018
  • Second round of reviews: November 19, 2018
  • Application Submission Deadline: December 1, 2018 at 8 pm EST
  • Final round of reviews: December 10, 2018
  • Sub-award Notification Announcement: December 21, 2018
  • Funds distributed by: January 15, 2019

NEW NPSEC STORE PRODUCTS!

The NPSEC Store is a good place to find EPA-approved materials with expanded 2015 WPS content. This is where you can order NPSEC, PERC, WPS, and state-specific products. For PERC products, PSEPs get a 5% discount if they purchase the products using the code we mailed you at checkout. We track all PERC sales by state and send 5% of all net sales in a particular state or territory back to the PSEP as a gift. 

Shop the NPSEC Store

PERC PRODUCTS

National Worker Protection Standard: A Manual for Trainers

Available in English and Spanish!

These EPA-approved manuals (English: EPA 730-B-16-001; Spanish: EPA 730-K-17-001)) begin with an introduction to pesticides and pesticide safety, including the federal pesticide regulations. They discusses each of the specific points that must be included in WPS training sessions and contains valuable information to help trainers prepare for and conduct pesticide safety training.

Purchase Here

How to Comply With the 2015 Revised Worker Protection Standard for Agricultural Pesticides

This EPA-approved manual will help users of agricultural pesticides comply with the requirements of the 2015 revised federal Worker Protection Standard. You should read this manual if you employ agricultural  workers or handlers, are involved in the production of agricultural plants as an owner/manager of an agricultural establishment or a commercial (for-hire) pesticide handling establishment, or work as a crop advisor.

Purchase Here

WPS Respiratory Protection Guide: Requirements for Employers of Pesticide Handlers

Under the Worker Protection Standard (WPS) as revised in 2015, there are new requirements for pesticide handlers when pesticide labels require the use of a respirator. This 45-page guide includes step-by-step fit-testing procedures, respirator selection guidance, medical evaluation options, and some frequently asked questions. 

Purchase Here

WPS Posters

Updated WPS Poster(s) for “Central Posting” areas and certain decontamination sites
This poster(s) complies with the requirements in the Worker Protection Standard (WPS) for agricultural pesticides.

Posters come in Large (22×34.5in) and Small (11×17) with a English/Spanish front, and the option of English or Spanish back. All Posters have a gloss laminate finish for durability.

Purchase Here

WPS Training Videos

These WPS training videos for agricultural workers and pesticide handlers apply to many sectors because they include footage and examples from orchards, forestry, nurseries, greenhouses, vineyards, and row crops.

Available in English and Spanish!

Purchase Here

WPS Standard Handbook for Agricultural Employers

Can be purchased individually or in bundles of 2 and 10!

This handbook is formatted as a small booklet, half the size of a sheet of paper. We hope you’ll find it as useful as a handout when training and/or inspecting agricultural work under the WPS.

Purchase Here 

Web-Based Training for Trainers of Agricultural Workers and Pesticide Handlers

Online training course!

This web-based course is EPA-approved, including 12 self-paced learning modules. The course provides the required information for trainers who will perform annual training for agricultural workers and pesticide handlers under the U.S. EPA Worker Protection Standard (WPS). It will guide you through the necessary procedures to provide effective training about pesticide safety topics.

Purchase Here

 

Request for Nominations of Experts To Consider for ad hoc Participation on Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), Scientific Advisory Panel (SAP)

This notice was originally created by the EPA and published on the Federal Register. A summary is provided below along with a full link to the article.

The EPA requests public nominations of scientific experts to be considered for ad hoc participation on the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) Scientific Advisory Panel (SAP) through membership on the Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA) Science Review Board (SRB). All nominees will be considered for ad hoc participation providing independent scientific advice to the EPA on health and safety issues related to pesticides. The FIFRA SAP is comprised of biologists, statisticians, toxicologists and other experts and is assisted in their reviews by members of the FQPA SRB.

Click here to read the full notice. 

NIFA invests $1.8M in methyl bromide transition research, outreach

This article was originally posted by Vegetable Growers News. A full link to the article can be found below. 

The National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) recently announced four Methyl Bromide Transition awards that will improve the management of major pests impacting U.S. watermelon production, tomato production.

The multi-tactic research and extension outcomes from these awards will result in the development of integrated, sustainable and economically viable management strategies targeting major pests impacting these production systems. The Methyl Bromide Transition program seeks to solve significant pest problems in key agricultural production and post-harvest management systems, processing facilities, and transport systems for which methyl bromide has been withdrawn.

These grants are part of NIFA’s Methyl Bromide Transition Program, Integrated Activities.

Click here to read the full article. 

NPSEC News – September 21st, 2018


 

NPSEC News – September 21st, 2018

NPSEC Video Feature

 

Raúl Perez, PSEP Coordinator in Puerto Rico, shares his experience at the 2018 National Pesticide Applicator Certification and Safety Education Workshop in San Antonio, TX.

List of Attendees from the 2018 NPACSE Workshop

An email will be sent to all participants of the 2018 NPACSE Workshop with a link and a password to access a list of attendees and their email addresses. Please let us know if you would like to opt out from being included on that list. 

Updates to PSEFMP FAQs. 

There have been some updates to the PSEFMP application FAQs to address some remaining questions. These include:
  • Will eXtension own the intellectual property or product developed?
  • What is the purpose of the non-public repository?
  • What is NPSEC’s role with the non-public repository?
  • Why is the sharing of a deliverable a requirement?
  • Are PSEFMP funds only PRIA funds?
  • Do I have to work with NPSEC?
  • What if I decide to work with NPSEC?

Shop the NPSEC Store

Price Drop! The price of the WPS Train The Trainer manual has been reduced.

New WPS products on the NPSEC Store: WPS videos, Spanish train the Trainer manual, WPS Ag Employers Handbook! 

The NPSEC Store is a good place to find EPA-approved materials with expanded 2015 WPS content. This is where you can order NPSEC, PERC, WPS, and state-specific products. For PERC products, PSEPs get a 5% discount if they purchase the products using the code we mailed you at checkout. We track all PERC sales by state and send 5% of all net sales in a particular state or territory back to the PSEP as a gift. 

NPSEC Shirts are Available!

If you are interested in purchasing a NPSEC polo shirt, please contact Courtney Weatherbee here by Friday, September 28th, 2018. 

PERC offers Web-Based WPS Train the Trainer Course

  • It’s posted here on the PERC website.
  • The cost is $35, which covers the cost of the hosting, course maintenance, and certification management.
  • It will be offered via the NPSEC Store, hosted by eXtension.

This web-based course provides the information required to train those who will train agricultural workers and pesticide handlers under the WPS (CFR 170). It will guide you through the necessary procedures to provide effective training about pesticide safety topics. This course is one way to become qualified to train agricultural workers and pesticide handlers under the WPS.

This is a self-paced eLearning course; you will view eLearning modules, take quizzes, and complete a final exam at your own pace. Once you have successfully completed all the course requirements, passed the final exam with the minimum passing score of 70% and then completed the course evaluation, you will be issued a WPS pesticide safety trainer certification. This course will take you approximately two to three hours to complete.

Completion of this course certifies you as a qualified WPS trainer of agricultural workers and pesticide handlers in the continental U.S, Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. You must check with your state or tribal pesticide regulatory agency for possible additional requirements.

If you have any questions about this message, please direct them to PERC using the contact information below.

Suzanne Forsyth, PERC Director
UC Davis Extension
530-757-8603
email: spforsyth@ucdavis.edu

Kaci Buhl, PERC Deputy Director
Oregon State University

541-737-8330
email: kaci.buhl@oregonstate.edu

Register for October 25th Webinar on Best Practices for Pesticide Ground Application

EPA is hosting a webinar titled “Best Practices for Ground Application” on October 25, 2018, from 2 – 3:30 p.m. ET. This webinar is tailored for growers, pesticide applicators, pest management professionals, and other interested stakeholders who work in crop production. 

The webinar will be presented by Dr. Greg Kruger, a weed science and application technology specialist from the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. The presentation will cover different methods of ground application, best practices for reducing pesticide spray particle drift when using ground application equipment, and a discussion of the optimization of weed control.

Register Here and Learn More About Reducing Pesticide Drift Here